Morikawa
Indigenous Atlantic Canada

$50M Historic claim settlement for Nova Scotia First Nation

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Land claims dating back to 1784, 1820, and 1848 respectively

A historic agreement has been concluded for the settlement of the Halifax County 1919 Invalid Surrender Specific Claim with Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation. The parties agreed upon a compensation amount of $49,204,071 to settle the specific claim.

“Today marks another step forward on a path of renewal and reconciliation with Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation. The settlement is a result of the continued work to right past wrongs, resolve longstanding disputes, and rebuild trust with members of Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation. This agreement will help support the communities’ ongoing efforts to improve living conditions and expand economic opportunities in their communities.” The Carolyn Bennett Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

$50M Historic claim settlement for  Nova Scotia First Nation

This specific claim addresses the issue of Canada breaching its duties with respect to the surrender and sale of three reserves of the Halifax County Band, which subsequently divided into what is today Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation. The reserves, IR#15 at Sambro, IR#16 at Ingram River, and IR#18 at Ship Harbour, were set aside in 1784, 1820, and 1848 respectively. Canada accepted this claim for negotiation in 2008 on the basis that Canada failed to conduct a surrender meeting and surrender vote in accordance with the Indian Act.

“We are pleased that our community ratified the 1919 Halifax County Invalid Surrender Claim. This settlement will benefit our membership today and into the future as our planned investments pay dividends.” Michael Sack Chief of Sipekne’katik

$50M Historic claim settlement for  Nova Scotia First Nation

Settling this specific claim is a significant step on the journey to reconciliation with Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation, helping to right past wrongs and create a better future for the members of these communities.

“It has taken 100 years to finally secure what the Halifax County Mi’kmaq were after in 1919 – land in Halifax Regional Municipality. This was a difficult negotiation. Our negotiation team working with the Councils overcame all the obstacles in our path. I am proud to say we have been able to honour the dreams of our ancestors while helping our current and future members to have access to more opportunities – now and into the future.” Bob Gloade Chief of Millbrook First Nation

Canada will keep working in partnership on the priorities of Sipekne’katik and the Millbrook First Nation, and advance on the path of reconciliation.

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