1st Anniversary of the Elimination of Sex-based Inequities in the Indian Act
Indigenous World News

1st Anniversary of the Elimination of Sex-based Inequities in the Indian Act

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Indigenous women have worked for decades to end sex-based discrimination in the Indian Act.

Today Canada marks the the one year anniversary of the the elimination of sex based inequities in the India Act. Under Bill S-3, advancing gender equality and reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples, removed the 1951 cut-off from the Indian Act registration provisions, ensuring that women and entitled descendants could register for status.

1st Anniversary of the Elimination of Sex-based Inequities in the Indian Act

Eligible individuals include descendants born prior to April 17, 1985 (or of a marriage before that date), of women who lost status or were removed from band lists because of their marriage to non-status men going back to 1869.

This step corrects an historical wrong, one whose effects are still being felt today. This wrong affected the descendants of women who lost their status because they married a non-status man. Descendants who were previously unable to register under the Indian Act due to this marriage are now eligible, in line with descendants of those who never lost their status.

The work on Bill S-3 began in 2016 and changed registration rights for Indigenous women and their descendants. Since 2015, the Trudeau government has worked to end discrimination and violence against Indigenous women and girls. This is only part of the work the Federal Government is doing in response to issues identified in the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

John A. MACDONALD’s 

“Today, we commemorate this important shift from a dark time in this country’s history toward restoring rights to Indigenous women and their descendants. We know that the actions of past governments were driven by racism, fear and flawed values. We also recognize that many colonial aspects still exist within the Indian Act and there is still much work to be done on gender equity in Canada.” Said the Ministers for Indigenous Affairs Carolyn Bennett and Marc Miller.

Indigenous women have worked for decades to end sex-based discrimination in the Indian Act.

Image source Canadian archives

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