Bill C-5, Sets September 30, for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
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Bill C-5, Sets September 30, for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

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Once Bill C-5 passes, it will mark the first national day for Indigenous reconciliation

Reconciliation with the Canadian Indigenous community has been the precipice of the Trudeau administration. Canada’s dismal and at times tragic tragic history with its Indigenous people stem from decades of systematic racism and ignorance to them, their culture, languages and teachings.

Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage

Canada’s Minister of Heritage Steven Guilbeault announced an important step in implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action #80 by introducing Bill C-5. This bill seeks to establish a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation for federally regulated workers that will be observed as a statutory holiday on September 30.

Subject to this legislation receiving Royal Assent, the new national day will honour survivors, their families and communities. It will also ensure that public commemoration of the tragic and painful history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.

Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage
Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage

“We recognize that there is still much work to do as a country to make progress on our shared path of reconciliation. By establishing a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we will have a day every year to reflect and honour the survivors of residential schools, ensuring they are never forgotten.”—said Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Canadian Heritage

This important announcement builds on the Budget 2019 announcement to provide $7 million over two years for communities across the country to commemorate the history and legacy of residential schools. In 2019–2020, the Government of Canada invested in six large national projects to educate and raise awareness about this dark chapter of Canadian history.

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