Seven New Cases of COVID-19 Reported In Nova Scotia
COVID-19 Atlantic Canada

Seven New Cases of COVID-19 Reported In Nova Scotia

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Strict COVID-19 restrictions see the COVID curb flattening within Nova Scotia

As of today, Dec. 24, Nova Scotia has 36 active cases of COVID-19. Seven new cases are being reported today.

Six of the cases are in Central Zone and one is in Western Zone. Two of the cases in Central Zone and the one in Western Zone are related to close contacts of previously reported cases. One case in Central Zone is related to travel and the other three cases in Central Zone are under investigation. One of the cases in Central Zone is in another province or territory. The person is a Nova Scotia resident and is included in our cumulative provincial data.

“I know following the gathering limits and other protocols can be a challenge at this special time of year,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Let’s remember that the hard work Nova Scotians have done to contain the virus means the restrictions here are not as tight as in other parts of the country. Let’s also be thankful for what we do have as we continue the good work to keep COVID-19 in check. I wish all Nova Scotians a safe holiday season and a Merry Christmas.”

There were 1,561 tests administered between Dec. 18-23 at the rapid-testing pop-up sites in Halifax, Dartmouth and Eskasoni. There were 174 tests at Eskasoni yesterday with no positive results, following 201 tests on Tuesday, Dec. 22, also with no positive results. The rapid testing in Eskasoni is now concluded. There is no indication of community exposure or spread in Eskasoni at this time.

Since Oct. 1, Nova Scotia has completed 104,277 tests. There have been 376 positive COVID-19 cases and no deaths. No one is currently in hospital. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 70. Three hundred and forty cases are now resolved. Cumulative cases may change as data is updated in Panorama.

“To those who celebrate Christmas, I wish you a Merry Christmas! Please ensure you are following all the public health guidelines while celebrating with loved ones,” said Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health. “Do your part by wearing a mask, limiting social contacts, practising social distancing, adhering to the gathering limit, staying home when feeling unwell and washing your hands.”

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance when and where required. Wearing a non-medical mask is mandatory in most indoor public places.

Rules concerning interprovincial travel within Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador have changed. The premiers of all four Atlantic provinces are cautioning against non-essential travel into neighbouring provinces.

Currently, all non-essential travel into Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador requires a 14-day self-isolation. All public health directives of each province must be followed. Under Nova Scotia’s Health Protection Act order, visitors from outside Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days unless they completed their self-isolation in another Atlantic province.

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