Wage Increase On April 1, Wait, Is This A Joke
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Wage Increase On April 1, Wait, Is This A Joke

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Wage increases on April 1 for workers in the human service sector

TDS News – The provincial government is investing $12.4 million to fund wage increases on April 1 for workers in the human service sector, including home support workers, community residence workers, special care home workers, and family support workers.

“The government values its partnership with facilities and agencies that provide important services, support and care to New Brunswickers in need,” said Social Development Minister Bruce Fitch. “We believe this investment will help address the significant challenges in the human services sector with respect to the recruitment and retention of workers.”

The investment announced in the 2021-22 budget will provide for the following wage increases for over 10,000 workers:

  • Home Support – an increase of 20 cents per hour, for an average wage of $15.50 per hour ($2.5 million investment).
  • Special Care Homes – an increase of 50 cents per hour, for an average wage of $15.50 per hour ($4.9 million investment).
  • Community Residences – an increase of 75 cents per hour, for an average wage of $16.80 per hour ($2.7 million investment).
  • Family Support – an increase of $1.30 per hour, for an average wage of $ 16.80 per hour ($1.2 million investment).
  • Attendant Care – an increase of $1.30 per hour, for an average wage of $16.80 per hour ($1.1 million investment).
Wage Increase On April 1, Wait, Is This A Joke

There about 1,000 workers in 85 community residences in New Brunswick providing care to about 570 residents. They provide residential care and services to adults with disabilities who are predominately 19 to 65 years of age. These residents have difficulties in cognition and/or behaviour which requires a high degree of care.

Home Support involves direct, in-home support to seniors and to adults with a disability and may include meal preparation and assistance with personal care. More than 4,500 home support workers provide care to about 5,300 seniors and to about 4,000 adults with disabilities.

About 5,000 workers in 366 Special Care Homes provide direct care in a safe living arrangement for individuals who require some assistance or support with day-to-day tasks.

Nearly 900,000 hours of service are provided by family support workers. They provide support related to children which involves interventions to help reduce the risk of abuse and neglect, and relief and support for children and youth with complex needs and medical challenges. They provide support to adults through services focused on teaching skills for independent living, facilitating opportunities for community inclusion, and providing respite for caregivers.

About 400 attendant care workers provide interventions requiring increased knowledge and/or experience beyond what can be provided by a home support worker. They typically require specific additional training by health-care professionals.

“Workers in the human service sector play a key role in providing a continuum of care for New Brunswickers in need, allowing them to remain in their own community,” said Fitch. “These workers contribute to ensuring that our long-term care systems provide people with the right kind of care at the right time.”

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