Not Just BC, Wildfires Rampant In Manitoba
Canada Environment

Not Just BC, Wildfires Rampant In Manitoba

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Wildfires remain rampant in Manitoba, innundating the province with smoke and haze.

Donovan Martin

The Manitoba Wildfire Service continues to state that there are high to extreme fire danger levels across the province. Firefighters have been continuously fighting fires throughout Manitoba. The sheer amount of smoke produced has created a haze that has loomed or Winnipeg and other prairie cities. This comes mere weeks after British Columbia was set ablaze by wildfires across their forests. Many speculated that the smoke in the air was blown over from B.C., but instead, Manitoban fires were causing citizen discomfort. To prevent further aggravation and stimulation, the Government of Manitoba has set out guidelines for all Manitobans to follow.

Firstly and primarily, all provincial burning permits remain cancelled provincewide and new permits will not be issued until the current conditions improve. Furthermore, more specific instructions and guidelines have been given to specific locations. Travel restrictions have been implemented in area 4 of Manitoba. Area 4 covers the large area north of the Wanipigow River, east of Lake Winnipeg to the Ontario border, including Atikaki Provincial Park, and north to Poplar River. Here, a full travel ban is in effect, closed to the public.

This specifically means:

• No access permitted. Travel ban in effect.
• No access to cottages.
• Permanent residents must be ready to leave on an hour’s notice.
• Campfires are not permitted.

In areas 1-8, consisting generally of southern Manitoba, these restrictions are implemented:
• All back-country travel is prohibited unless under the authority of a travel permit.
• Camping is restricted to developed campgrounds.
• Campfires are not permitted.
• Access to cottages is allowed on designated roads; however, travel permits will be required for remote cottages.
• Industry and outfitters may be restricted in their operations and should contact their local Manitoba Conservation and Climate office for more information.

In areas 9-14 and 16, consisting generally of the northern parts of Manitoba, these restrictions are implemented:

• Provincial burning permits are cancelled.
• Motorized backcountry travel, including ATVs and other off-road vehicles, is prohibited unless under the authority of a travel permit.
• Camping is restricted to developed campgrounds.
• Campfires are permitted only between the hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m.
• Wayside parks remain open.
• Landing and launching are restricted to developed shorelines only.
• Industry and outfitters may be restricted in their operations and should contact their local Manitoba Conservation and Climate office for more information.

In area 15, consisting of the northern-most part of Manitoba, these restrictions are implemented:

• Provincial burning permits are cancelled.
• Campfires are permitted only between the hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m.
• Motorized back-country travel, including ATVs and other off-road vehicles, is prohibited from
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. unless otherwise approved by a travel permit.

To see which areas of the provinces are affected, you can look at the Conservation and Climate Map provided by the Manitoban government. With the changing climate globally, if more immediate action is not taken, fires may become a constant in Canada. The Daily Scrum wishes that all Manitobans remain safe while following restrictions.

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