Election Day In Canada, Red Tsunami Or A Blue Wave?
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Election Day In Canada, Red Tsunami Or A Blue Wave?

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Will the results on election day be the change Canadians want?

Minority governments rarely last as history has shown Canadians. So in October 2020, to have the Liberal government survive two votes of no confidence within 30 days is an anomaly.

Earlier this year, Trudeau and the Federal Liberals asked for a vote of no confidence to squash Erin O’Toole’s attempt to establish a committee on corruption led by his Conservative opposition. If successful, the committee would have sweeping new investigative powers to probe the WE Charity Scandal. The Conservative Party felt Trudeau circumvented the committee by calling for a vote of no confidence.

“We know that if Parliament determines they no longer have confidence in the minority government, then, unfortunately, there will be elections.” Said, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

Going into the vote, the NDP did not reveal if they planned to support or bring down the Liberal government. “People need help right now. They need confidence in the future. They’re not looking for an election. So New Democrats will not give Prime Minister Trudeau the election he’s looking for,” NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said prior to voting.

The Trudeau administration signalled frustration with not having the ability to pass meaningful legislation in the middle of the pandemic needed to help Canadians. After months of speculation of a pandemic election, Trudeau visited Rideau Hall on August 12th and asked the newly minted Governor General Mary Simon to dissolve the 43rd Parliament. The dissolution of parliament triggered today’s election to pick the country’s 44th parliament.

With the Liberals riding a wave of support for the Trudeau administration’s handling of the COVID-19 crisis, the party felt it was time to send Canadians to the polls, two years into the government’s mandate. Depending on what poll you are following, both the Liberals and Conservatives will form a minority government. In other words, polls are as reliable as a long-distance relationship. They are purely antidotal and highly inaccurate.

The only accurate poll is the one on election night after all the votes have been counted unless you live in America. Canadians will have to choose if they stay the course with the Trudeau administration or head in a new direction under O’Toole’s Conservative party.

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