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“Plan to Catch Up” Extended By Ontario Health Minister Lecce

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The Ford government commits $26.6 billion in funding for the 2022-23 school year, the highest investment in public education in Ontario’s history

For the 2022-2023 school year, the province of Ontario will continue to support the learning recovery journey of all students, including those affected by learning disruptions. To help students get back on track and learn the skills they need for the jobs of tomorrow, the province’s Plan to Catch Up focuses on providing them with the best possible learning experience.

Ontario’s Plan to Catch Up is squarely focused on the priorities of parents and includes five key components:

  • Getting kids back in classrooms in September, on time, with a full school experience that includes extra-curricular like clubs, band, and field trips;
  • New tutoring supports to fill gaps in learning;
  • Preparing students for the jobs of tomorrow;
  • Providing more money to build schools and improve education; and
  • Helping students with historic funding for mental health supports.

“Our government is looking ahead as we remain squarely focused on ensuring students receive the best stable learning experience possible, and that starts with them being in class, on time, with all of the experiences students deserve.

We have a plan for students to catch up, including the largest tutoring program in Ontario’s history, a modernized skills-focused curriculum to prepare students for the jobs of tomorrow, and enhanced mental health supports.” said Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education.

Since August 2020, more than $665 million has been allocated to improve ventilation and filtration in schools as part of the province’s efforts to protect against COVID-19. Over the course of the pandemic, child care programs stayed open and served children and their families, including providing emergency childcare for front-line workers during periods of school closure and remote learning.

The government since then has made vital investments that students and educators are already benefiting from, including:

– More than $26.6 billion in funding for the 2022-23 school year, the highest investment in public education in Ontario’s history.

– Investing more than $175 million for enhanced tutoring support programs delivered by school boards and community partners, focusing on reading, writing, and math.

– $304 million in time-limited funding to support hiring up to 3,000 front-line staff, including teachers, early childhood educators, educational assistants, and other education workers.

– Investing $14 billion to build state-of-the-art schools and classrooms and renew and repair existing schools, including $2.1 billion for the 2022-23 school year.

– Allocating $90 million for mental health initiatives and student support, a 420 percent increase from 2017-18.

Additional funding to support students with exceptionalities through a $93 million increase in funding for the Special Education Grant and over $9 million in funding to support the new de-streamed grade nine program, with an emphasis on supporting students most at risk including students from racialized, Black, immigrant, and Indigenous communities.